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Alternative Photographic Techniques NOT a place for Photoshop, this is for devotees of analog photographic techniques such as lith, gum, or bromoil printing, toy cameras and pinhole work

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Old 08-28-2016, 09:56 AM   #1
MikeBel
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Need printing solution for hand-coloring

I have read Terri's article on hand-coloring. Thank you Terri for writing this! I find it very informative.

https://alternativephoto2015.wordpre...ls-and-beyond/

So I no longer have a darkroom, so that option is off the table. I've contacted a few big labs to see if they print fiber-based non-RC prints and the best I found is an artist paper at something like $30 per 8x10. Not thrilled about that option right now. I didn't ask them about inkjet yet; that should be my next inquiry.

From the article I see that pigment-based archival inkjet papers with a coating will work. I don't have an inkjet printer any longer so if I'm going to print my own I'll need to invest in one. As far as inkjet printers go, I guess first I need to decide how large a print I might want and work from there. I know this is a fairly expensive investment.

So my questions are:
1) What brand/model inkjet printers would you recommend looking at? I know they change daily, but if you can point me in the right direction, great!

2) Does anyone have a lab (that mailorders) they could recommend if I wanted to outsource my printing?

I think I'd rather print my own if possible, but the cost versus a lab doing the printing for me is the major consideration.

Thanks for any advice!
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Old 08-28-2016, 01:27 PM   #2
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Hey Mike - well, I'll answer you as best I can here.

First, a question: did you take that Alternative Photography course in 2015? I'm curious how that article ended up there.

So, on to your questions: I agree that $30 to have someone make your enlargements for you is pretty steep for an 8x10. They may not even print it to match hand coloring print standards, which is roughly 10% lighter overall and to take care to burn in any large areas of white. You could pay a lot and still not have a good starting point for your hand coloring.

Off the table with that option!

Having said that, I still believe that hand coloring on darkroom prints will give you the best outcome. Plus, once you've made one good print, you can stand there and do a few more just like it, in case of any screwups or just changing out color schemes. To that end, you may want to check on availability of any darkrooms through a local college campus, photography group, or even any public art centers that offer classes in various art genres. Worth a try.

If that fails, and you don't mind making an investment in a good home photo printer, that would be a pretty good setup. In fact, I did this for some time before getting my own darkroom set up. You'll want scans made of your negatives so you have a digital file to work with. You can also invest in a film scanner, which will come with various film holders for 35 and 120 film, at a minimum. I've only used Epson, and have a fairly new one now, though it's not cheap (a v800). You could certainly look at any of those in the Epson line, from the v600 on up to the v850. Canon also makes film scanners, but I can't say anything about performance - should be plenty of info online for comparison shopping!

But you could probably take your negs to any good photo lab and they could have pro equipment and scan them for you. You only start saving $$ by buying your own equipment if you plan to stick with this *hybrid* approach of film scanning/photo printer home printing for a long, long time.

For photo printers, just make sure they take pigment-based inks (as opposed to dyes), as they will actually have good archival properties.
I still use my old Epson 2200 photo printer, getting up in years but still works great. There are so many on the market, Epson, Canon, perhaps HP. Just stick with pigment-based inks, get the best your budget will allow.

Gosh, I don't use mail-order printing and can't help. Could be that someone else on here has used a few and can jump in here!

It might be possible that a good photo lab could do your printing, as well as your scanning. Kind of one-stop shopping that might be pricey, but until you're really committed to the hybrid work flow, it might make more sense for you.

However you get there, when you have a print in hand, you'll want to coat it with a workable fix kind of spray. Krylon makes a good one, though there are other brands, too. You'll use this spray for a couple of coats and wait until it dries before applying photo oils or pencils - and you won't need to use any other prep for your print.

Hope I've helped more than confused.
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Old 08-28-2016, 05:59 PM   #3
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Hi Terri,
Thanks for all your input! My replies are below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Terri View Post
First, a question: did you take that Alternative Photography course in 2015? I'm curious how that article ended up there.

I didn't take a class, in fact I was going to ask if you teach a class on hand-coloring. I just googled hand-coloring and followed the rabbit hole and it led to a link to your article.

I agree that $30 to have someone make your enlargements for you is pretty steep for an 8x10. They may not even print it to match hand coloring print standards, which is roughly 10% lighter overall and to take care to burn in any large areas of white.

Agreed! And I saw your 10% tip in your article and thought it was an excellent suggestion.


Having said that, I still believe that hand coloring on darkroom prints will give you the best outcome.

I spent about 30 years doing darkroom work. I went digital about 13 years ago and don't really want to go back. I understand your point, those prints would be best, but I just don't want to get back in the soup.


If that fails, and you don't mind making an investment in a good home photo printer, that would be a pretty good setup.
I'm pretty sure this is where I'm headed.

But you could probably take your negs to any good photo lab and they could have pro equipment and scan them for you.

I'm shooting all digital now. I even had a D200 converted to IR. I do have an older Kodak film scanner because I still have a ton of negs.

I realize that this forum is more for traditional techniques so I hope you don't mind me hanging around.


For photo printers, just make sure they take pigment-based inks (as opposed to dyes), as they will actually have good archival properties.
I still use my old Epson 2200 photo printer, getting up in years but still works great.

Yes my searches since this morning point towards Epson as having a good selection of pigment-based inks. Terri, what inkjet papers would you suggest using considering hand-coloring is my goal?


However you get there, when you have a print in hand, you'll want to coat it with a workable fix kind of spray. Krylon makes a good one, though there are other brands, too.

Great, thanks! This was another question I forgot to ask. I did a Krylon search and they have a bunch of sprays. Would one of these be the one you're thinking of?

http://www.krylon.com/products/matte-finish/

http://www.krylon.com/products/workable-fixatif/

Hope I've helped more than confused.

You're definitely helping! Thank you so much!

Last edited by MikeBel; 08-28-2016 at 06:36 PM.
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Old 08-28-2016, 06:49 PM   #4
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Hi Mike!

Well, I'm glad you found some useful info up there. It sounds like you'll be using your digital files, so you will likely want to put more $$ in a good printer for yourself. I think you're on the right track by doing lots of reading online reviews and such.

About the Krylon: the workable fix is the one! It's a big brand name and easy to find, though there may be duplicate products a little cheaper. But for getting started, it's also nice to have a comfort zone with this kind of product.

About inkjet papers: see the Freestyle Photo banner at the top of the forum's main page? Click on that and head on over to their website. They just put out an excellent catalog of all kinds of new inkjet papers. It's very exciting to see the progress in these papers. You can get on their mailing list and they'll shoot you a catalog. The most recent one is page after page of various high-quality brand names, tested by the folks who work there, comparing the strengths and weaknesses of each. I don't do much inkjet printing right now, but this kind of stuff even makes me want to try a few! A sample pack (or three) is always a good way to find some that you love. Just like in the darkroom, you can marry different papers with different subject matter. Fun stuff!

I realize that this forum is more for traditional techniques so I hope you don't mind me hanging around.

Actually, I'm the odd man out here. Most of our regular members have embraced digital but many have good darkroom backgrounds, too. There are a few analog members who swing through here occasionally, but for the most part, you're in good company!
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Old 02-04-2017, 07:51 PM   #5
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Hi Terri & all,
I'm making progress slowly but surely. After a lot of research I decided on a Canon P-10 pigment ink printer, which I got in January. It has produced some very nice prints. However my goal is still to hand color my inkjet prints. I've tried about 7 types of papers so far, both with and without the fixative spray, and none have been satisfactory. Some too absorptive, and some not enough.

Terri, I reread your article and you spoke about a ground made from gelatin that you applied to ink jet paper. I think that will be one of my next tests. I was wondering if their are certain types of papers you'd recommend using a ground with that would give good results for hand coloring? Or does using the ground make any type of paper suited for coloring? Any help is appreciated! This hurdle is a frustrating one.

Thank you!!

PS. Public Service Announcement: B&H Photo had a killer deal on Canon printers just after Christmas. After a Canon rebate and a B&H discount the printer was $250. Lists at $699. If you're looking for a printer keep an eye on B&H. They are also a great company to do business with, from my experiences.

Last edited by MikeBel; 02-05-2017 at 08:55 AM.
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Old 02-05-2017, 04:56 PM   #6
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Hi Mike - nice to see you back! Glad that the experimentation is going well.

You mentioned the ground from gelatin. I used plain old Knox gelatin (which I may have mentioned in the article) and it works great.

To answer your question about paper types for this technique, I used this ground mainly when I wanted to print on an un-treated artist paper. One that I used a lot was Arches watercolor paper. I could run this paper easily through my printer, and print the image and let it alone for a good 24 hours - no particular reason other than to assure myself that it was fully dried/cured. (The Epson printer I have uses pigmented inks, very archival.)

After that, I felt confident to apply the gelatin ground as described.

I found a scan that is a good example, so I posted it below. I had come across an old, discolored B&W print of my mother and me in a family album. I scanned it and digitally restored it, then printed it out on a piece of the Arches watercolor paper (hot press, which has a smooth surface as compared to cold-press, which has more texture). Applied the gelatin ground and was able to hand color with photo oils as well as oil pencils.




The oils went on easily, you just use a light touch while blending. I would recommend the Arches because I know it's high quality, but any un-treated hot-press watercolor artist paper should give similar results. Fabriano, Hahnemuhle, Strathmore are good brands, too. Usually, these kinds of papers are sold in oversize sheets (like 22x30) that you cut or tear down into the print size you want. If you go this route, pay attention to the weight of the paper, too - 90 pound weight is on the light side, 300 pound is rather thick, and you may have to use a rear-load tray on your printer to accommodate thicker sheets. (Seems to me I split the difference and went with 140 pound, but off the top of my head, not 100% sure).

If you have a good art supply store near you, you can usually buy them by the sheet - online they are usually in packs of 5 or 10, which is a LOT if you just want to experiment with various weights and shades of white. Generally, any 100% cotton rag paper will accept the gelatin ground, even if the paper is referred to as having "been sized" by the manufacturer. I never had much luck without adding some kind of ground, either the sprays or the gelatin.

I'd love to see some of your work, if you can get it scanned to upload.

Good luck, and have fun!
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Old 02-08-2017, 04:37 PM   #7
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Terri, thank you so much for your information and explanation on the ground technique!! I will definitely begin testing this method this weekend and it should be a winner based on your testing and results. Can't wait!

It's amazing you chose that photo to post; it was in your article as well and it was my favorite image!! It's beautiful and you really nailed the retro feel. Very cool.

I spent several hours recently organizing/ re-organizing my image file system. So now that I can actually find my images I'll be happy to post some here. Once I get a hand-colored piece completed I'll scan it and post also, but don't hold your breath, I work slow, LOL!

Thanks!

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Old 02-09-2017, 01:10 PM   #8
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Quote:
Once I get a hand-colored piece completed I'll scan it and post also, but don't hold your breath, I work slow, LOL!
No problem! Part of the appeal of hand coloring (and other alternative photographic processes) is the slowness in which one works. It slows the hand, the mind - and probably the breathing, too - I find it very relaxing.

I think working slowly is an inherent part of anything that is crafted by hand - part of the reason some people aren't comfortable with it. There are other processes to play with that give you finished work quickly, and lots of people prefer this.

Hand coloring is fast compared to bromoil - probably the most time-consuming of them all.
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Old 02-10-2017, 12:22 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terri View Post
No problem! Part of the appeal of hand coloring (and other alternative photographic processes) is the slowness in which one works. It slows the hand, the mind - and probably the breathing, too - I find it very relaxing.
Yes I agree! These are some of my big reasons for wanting to get back to hand coloring. I found a few ways to do it digitally, and while the results are interesting, it just doesn't give you the artistic feeling that HC does.
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Old 02-12-2017, 02:27 PM   #10
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Great to see your conversation - takes me back to the 1950's when I did some hand "tinting" using inks and watercolours on the old Bromide papers. I think I built my first enlarger in 1953. Nowdays I just "paint with pixels"!
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Old 02-14-2017, 11:08 AM   #11
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Thanks, Fenman! So many, many changes in papers over the years. I've read that the older bromide papers were superior when working with certain techniques. Nowadays we just try to find good variable contrast semi-matte, and call it good. Times have changed, haven't they?

Lots of people love using programs, like Corel, to do image tinting, and they can look great, too.
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Old 02-15-2017, 05:58 PM   #12
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Hi Fenman. I'm sure you've got lots of great experience and techniques. Don't be shy; I'm all ears!

Terri, I've tried the ground on some test prints of various papers. Initial results are OK; better than what I had but not on par with where I want to be. I have ordered a pad of the Arches Watercolor paper (hot press) that you have used. That should be here Friday. Some of the papers I tried were a rag with a heavy texture (absorbed too much) and some were matte & satin which didn't absorb enough. "The Goldilocks Effect."

So until the new paper shows up I have a few questions:

1) Does this sound right? I took 1 packet of the Knox and mixed it with 5 oz hot water. I let it sit for 2 hours; it turned to gelatin. I slowly re-heated it, stirring the whole time. Once back to a liquid I then painted it on with a foam brush, in both directions.

2) How light or heavy do you apply it? I gave it a medium coat. Or should it be 2 coats, allowing drying in between?

3) I got some pretty good paper curl as the prints dried. I flattened the prints under weight overnight. I'm guessing this pretty normal?

4) Cleaning a print. I do have kneaded erasers and they worked OK, but can or should I use Marlene when needed? I'm thinking it would also remove the ground. So any more tips on cleaning?

Thanks!
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Old 02-22-2017, 04:15 PM   #13
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I have not done any tinting on "Real" photos since the late 1950's and only started digitally using the very first editions of Photoshop (It came on a bundle of removable discs) and on a programme called ColoutIt of about the same time. I used it to colour scans of old B&W postcards from the 1900's and a few portraits. The trick is to always use a very soft brush and experimenting with either low opacity or flow (2-3%).
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Old 02-22-2017, 05:02 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by MikeBel View Post
Hi Fenman. I'm sure you've got lots of great experience and techniques. Don't be shy; I'm all ears!

Terri, I've tried the ground on some test prints of various papers. Initial results are OK; better than what I had but not on par with where I want to be. I have ordered a pad of the Arches Watercolor paper (hot press) that you have used. That should be here Friday. Some of the papers I tried were a rag with a heavy texture (absorbed too much) and some were matte & satin which didn't absorb enough. "The Goldilocks Effect."

So until the new paper shows up I have a few questions:

1) Does this sound right? I took 1 packet of the Knox and mixed it with 5 oz hot water. I let it sit for 2 hours; it turned to gelatin. I slowly re-heated it, stirring the whole time. Once back to a liquid I then painted it on with a foam brush, in both directions.

2) How light or heavy do you apply it? I gave it a medium coat. Or should it be 2 coats, allowing drying in between?

3) I got some pretty good paper curl as the prints dried. I flattened the prints under weight overnight. I'm guessing this pretty normal?

4) Cleaning a print. I do have kneaded erasers and they worked OK, but can or should I use Marlene when needed? I'm thinking it would also remove the ground. So any more tips on cleaning?

Thanks!
Hey Mike - I'm sorry I didn't see this until today. Did the hot press paper arrive yet? That should be your best bet with this ground technique.

First, let me address some of your questions.

For the first question - yes, 1 packet of the Knox gelatin to 5 oz. water. Now, you mentioned "hot" water - so maybe that's a variable here. Make sure the water is warm enough to dissolve the gelatin, but definitely not super hot. Just mix to dissolve, cover and leave it overnight, or at least 4-5 hours, at room temp. (You can store any left over in the fridge.) Also, heat-related, you want to warm it up slowly and gently, and don't let it get too hot (and certainly not to a boil). This stuff is a protein and can denature if overheated.

The ratio I was taught was 1 packet to 5 oz. water - but since paper has variables, that may be a bit strong for some papers. I think the foam roller was fine to use, but if it had a hard shine to it when it dried, you could dilute it with a bit more water, maybe 10% (1/2 an ounce) for starters. The paper should have a sheen to it when it's dried, but should be a dull sheen - think about interior house paint, an eggshell vs. gloss finish, if that helps.

Question 2: Two thin coats (applied just like you described) is better than one heavier coat.

Q. 3: I think some paper curl is to be expected - but not severe. Again, a couple of thin coats is less likely to really soak the paper and should help reduce that curl. Using books to flatten is fine.

Q. 4: Cleaning is always going to be more of a challenge when using this ground method on an inkjet. The kneaded eraser is really the most gentle and effective way. Another option: sounds crazy, but a small piece of clear plastic wrap, like Saran wrap, wadded up into a tight little ball, can be carefully dabbed over a large-ish area of solid color you'd like to see lifted. It won't clean, per se, but it will lift off enough pigment to make using the kneaded eraser more effective. Marlene is best left to darkroom prints, really - you're right, it will eat off the ground and likely ruin your print. When I'm coloring on an inkjet, I make at least 1 (usually 2) extra prints while I have the print settings the way I want them. If I ruin a print, I have one ready to go.

Did I mention, in that old article, about testing an area to make sure the paper is sealed? A small bottle of linseed oil (available at any art supply store) is very useful. After applying the gelatin and it's dried, just put a small drop over the gelatin - and let it sit overnight. Turn the print over in the morning - there should be zero bleeding of oil. Then you know that paper is sealed perfectly.

I hope the Arches has arrived! Happy painting!
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Old 02-24-2017, 05:06 PM   #15
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Hey Terri,
No worries, I'm just glad I have someone to ask questions to on the hand-coloring! Thank you! Yes the paper arrived and last weekend and I tried a print.

Results:
1) Too heavy on the application of the ground, I think. I'll try again this weekend with lighter coats. I had too much curl, I'm pretty sure.
2) I did use hot tap water so I'll adjust that in case it makes a difference.
3) Yes I reheated very slowly and stirred constantly. I think it coated OK.
4) I did the "seal test" with a drop of water overnight and no bleed-through.
5) Oils application. Arghhh!! I'm sure I'm applying it too thick. Blending & smoothing was hard. Novice mistakes.
6) I did try my Marshall pencils and they actually worked pretty well.

Question on the Marshall's oils.
1) My test has been on flesh tones and clothing. My Flesh and Basic Flesh oils are much darker/ browner than the color band on the tube indicates. I need to apply less, but can I cut it/dilute it with another oil to get a better skin tone? The skin tones in your photo are beautiful. How did you do that? Which leads to my next question...

2) Do you teach any classes in hand-coloring or possibly a private class? Not sure where you are, but my work takes me all over the eastern 1/2 of the country. I'm in O'hare as I type this hoping my flight doesn't get cancelled so I can get home tonight!

I've got a funny story for you. See my next post here.
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Old 02-24-2017, 05:19 PM   #16
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Funny story

Terri, so I bought the book by Theresa Airey, Creative Photo Printmaking, that I read about in your article. It has some infrared info as well as info on hand coloring and the ground technique. I thought it would be a great reference book to have.

I bought it off Amazon and it was listed as "new". It showed up in clear shrink wrap and certainly looked brand new. I anxiously opened it only to find on the inside cover a personal inscription written, signed and dated (1997) by Miss Airey! It was addressed to a couple and she wished them success with their printmaking! Inside, the pages of the book were perfect except for some highlighting, which was only in the section on hand-coloring and the ground recipe!! The only sections I was primarily interested in. Serendipity?

Weird, huh? And I swear this is a true story.

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Old 02-26-2017, 12:49 PM   #17
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That really is a wild story! Apparently someone else was trying to memorize that trick with using Knox as a ground. I think most people who are shooting digital and want to handcolor inkjet prints will benefit from it.

I'm so happy that the book is still out there! The last time I did a search, it was just listed as "out of print." I have several books from that time frame: the Theresa Airey, and also I would recommend you look for Jill Enfield's book on alt processes, if you're interested. She doesn't go into as much detail as Airey on handcoloring, but still does lovely work and her chapter is interesting.

How fun that you got a signed copy!

Okay - now to the questions. When it comes to the Flesh and Basic Flesh, yes, they can be tricky. I never use them alone - they need to be warmed up a bit. Try this: squeeze out a small, pea-sized drop of Flesh and then, next to it, squeeze out an even smaller amount of Cheek. Have a toothpick handy and add the Cheek a tiny bit at a time, and blend. You don't want it to get too rosy, but you want to liven it up a bit. Overall, over a face, I will start with that and blend well.

To answer your second question, Yes, I've taught hand coloring workshops, and I agree it's the best way to learn. A basic workshop consists of coloring one portrait and one landscape, with the prints being student's choice - usually a 2-day (weekend) workshop. I'm in Georgia - I noticed you are in Acworth, and I think we're about an hour and a half from each other. How funny is that? Shoot me a PM if you want to set something up. (I can be flexible if you're mainly interested in portraits, of course.)

BTW, I'm happy you were able to score the Marshall's pencils, too - your best friend for detail work.
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Old 03-01-2017, 09:26 PM   #18
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Hi Terri, PM sent.
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